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. >> but they are more -- their goal is to educate the public on a issue that impacts the environment, not lining their pocketbooks. neil: all right. >> their goal is to influence legislation, that is the point. neil: if you can agree on outlawing yoko ono concerts we might be off to the races, but thank you. this just in, that thing on your plate is still a biscuit. but it is not "seabiscuit." think this horse meat threat went too far. during sequestration, meet the restaurant ceo who said it damn near cost him business before and after sequestration. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it
-on/risk-off environment that we have to be cautious. yes, there's room to grows and investors have totally forgotten about europe since last summer. don't be surprised if it comes back later on this year. and quite heavily. >> how does it come back, though? is it the banking sector? specifically, let's talk about actual impacts to the u.s. market. >> well, the impact has a lot to do with the concern of where we're going, the kind of money we're spending and the kind of debt we have. you know, we're not too far behind europe. and obviously, we're a long way away from greece, but when you look at germany and france and some other companies, it's still a very dangerous environment. they still have a very low to negative growth rate. we're still looking at positive. you know, we had some good response from the housing market earlier today, but we still need to be very, very cautious. yes, there's room to grow. prices of stocks are not overvalued by no means. but we still need to be very cautious of where we're going in terms of debt and the economy. >> all right. so we're vulnerable in that regard. let's talk
boring monetary policy environment. nothing has happened. a lot of detailed nuances, minor changes in wording in the fed statement. actually, that's what we ought to want. monetary policy ought to be as boring as the electricity supply. when you turn the light switch on you want allied-signal one. you don't need to know anything more. that's where we are right now. but there is an issue lurking in the background that needs to be discussed. it is not being discussed in the market or in the fed. cheryl: what is it? >> that issue, that issue has to do with congress -- granting that fed the party in 2008 to pay interest on bank reserves. and that interest is now only about 5 billion per year at 25 basis points. but at an interest rate of 1 percent where the fed is going to be going in some places along the way that would be four times as much. assuming that reserves are in the neighborhood of 2 trillion which is where they are no. as the fed goes of, go to 2% that doubles once again. think about the fiscal clef the legislation that was accomplished at the very end of last year, signed
, what do you think? >> we have gone pretty far, pretty fast. in an interest rate environment. look at it from a relative basis, so that the equity market is pretty interesting place to be. we really haven't seen for a while. lou: we will get some indications on the housing market, we will look at building permits primarily, what are you expecting? >> still think the housing market is in pretty good shape, but if you look at the opportunity out there, seeing some places the housing market is doing pretty well, seeing a lot of the excess capacity in the marketplace, in a zero interest environment, a fair amount of the capacity, investment classes come in and actually bought up a fair amount of those equities. are we going back to the old days, absolutely not. lou: sean matthews, good to have you with us. now to the weekend talks office where "oz" continued to dominate, the prequel to "the wizard of oz." easily taken the number one spt for the second weekend in a row. warner bros. failed to live up to the title debuting at $10.3 million. nielsen will relate sunday ratings tomorrow. y
's a real big play. i'd love to know how citi holdings is doing in this rising environment. >> there's a lot to like. i like citi here and there you have the opening bell here. visa celebrating five years of trading on the nyse and at the nasdaq, the academy of nutrition and dietetics celebrating national nutrition month. >> by the way, speaking of banks and refinancing, the american consumer continues to refinance their household debt either through a refi of their actual home or taking out another credit card with a zero balance or low-balance offer and transferring the balance. visa was a $69 stock two years ago and it's opening today at about $159, right? >> look at that gain. in a market where people are still weak and we still have a tough consumer. >> remember, big international play. >> yes. much more so than ma. >> and it's just a very well-run company. >> a lot of american guys who have been good and have also been run by a foreign individual, and i don't mean to be phonetic, but this is a big worldwide company. >> i changed banks recently because my bank ceased banking so i got a
environment. of course he's got a good record on inflation. he got lucky as it per takes to inflation because we had deleveraging. >> andy bush, the best part of jim is he's going to give you all these reasons, what does he call them, doppelganger reasons. when you have lecamp on the show it's not what he says it's what he's doing. he's like a federal government official. not watch what he says but what he's doing. that's why i love the guy. look at him he can't stop smiling. neither can you. you're both great. thank you so much. now folks, a busy day and night on capitol hill. the senate is busy voting on amendment after amendment in their budget bill. we got two distinguished senators about to join us give us their take and later on the show why can't police departments get any ammunition while the department of homeland security has bought up 1.6 billion rounds in the past year. there's no ammo for handdowns, shot guns, rifles, for training. what's up with this or is the dhs in a form of gun control that the congress can't legislate? folks don't forget free market capitalism is the best pa
be a number of amendments voted on. vote a rama may include democratic amendments on the environment or republicans trying to substitute the house budget plan. >> and cool under pressure tuesday during his state of the city address when a man rushed onto the stage, threw down a flag and started yelling. security wrestled him to the ground. the mayor said it happened so fast he didn't have time to be scared. >> and the trip to israel has released this official trailer. let's take a look. >> we welcome president obama to israel. >> the bonds between the united states and israel are unbreakable. and the commitment of the united states to the security of israel is iron clad. ♪ thank you for being a friend >> and that's your morning dish of scrambled politics. >> wow. >> i'm kind of at a loss for words. anything that uses the golden girl theme side has to be good. >> is it serious? is it mock something being sarcastic. >> making light of it. >> don't look too much into it then? >> exactly. bill karins is with us. do you have good news on the first day of spring. >> it's spring! that's t
it here and having it here under this environment. there's an amazing opportunity being lost. >> neil: think about if you're looking at the economy turning around and betting on a turn-around obviously you would use that money and invest in plants and equipment and new shops and all. but what a lot of these companies tend to do, boost the dividends, buy back stock, and maybe take out a competitor, but they don't expand. >> well, one of the problems with apple is, i mean, it's got a problem because it's too successful. it's got this cash and you want to be careful that you don't do something stupid with it and apple keeps selling more iphones by spending more money and avoid making acquisitions. and sisco bought the flip video camera and the fact that they were able to sit on it, is an indicator of how well it's doing. >> neil: charlie. >> i would say this is a big debate in america. jeff immelt said in a world where you have to worry about terrorism at any point you need a lot of cash on hand, what that might do to your business. >> neil: adam, is this a good or bad sign for you. >> i
or even buy a new home? >> the interest rate environment has been great for five years now. they are rising from such a low point. i do not think another 100 basis point rise will do that. the economy slowly creeks upwards, we will see an improvement on the housing market. there was a chart that we had during the bubble. as i said, we have the climbing no class incomes. we have housing prices starting to rise again. watch for a repeat of the previous bubble. dagen: you could see a divergence from not, correct? >> we very well could. fannie mae is purchasing the% down loans again. dagen: diggity dog. uncle sam is standing willing and ready. when it you be a fool not to take advantage of that? >> there are some people that have certain libertarian market people that would balk at it. i think we are starting to pick up. do not get too excited when all the obamacare taxes kick in next year. i would go into any of the markets like miami. the whole purchase to rent phenomenon, all the investors are jumping in and buying rental properties. the holster is wearing off on that. it di
cartwright campaigned on the environment, corporate tax reform and openly embraced the president's health care reform. something his democratic rival voted against. cartwright won the democratic primary by double digits and went on to easily beat his republican challenger. joining me, congressman matt cartwright. also joining with us fellow freshman who we met a few weeks ago. we save the biography a little bit. indiana republican congressman luke messer, president of the republican freshman class. congressman cartwright, you are one of four presidents, i need to get that clear, right? have you guys decided how you serve? >> that's -- we have. the first year is going to be split. we have co-presidents the first year between me and a terrific congressman from san antonio, texas. joaquin castro. we'll be co-presidents the first year. the second year will be michelle luhan gresham from new mexico. and a terrific congressman from maryland, john delaney. >> who we met just last week here. congressman cartwright i want to start with you. i know you guys had a bipartisan meeting last week with b
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> all right. welcome >>> all right. welcome back, everybody. first up, last week, president obama told a tv interviewer he didn't have immediate debt crisis. or we in america don't have an immediate debt crisis. and this weekend speaker boehner said basically the same thing. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis. but we all know that we have one looming. >> all right. you know what, i think they both could be right. i don't think we have an immediate debt crisis. i like to see more growth, not just debt root canal. oh, my god, i said it. that's, by the way, why the business round table of american ceos is pushing hard for a lower, more competitive, more pro-growth 25% corporate tax rate. so let's talk about this. steve forbes, judd gregg, jared bernstein, still with us. all right, steve forbes, look, i have -- i want to balance the budge
that he understands the context of circumstances, the environment they live in. demonstrate that he gets their fears. but also reach out at the same point and say, there is a way, given everything that israel does, given israel's capacity in fact to do things there is a way to still work for peace and there's a reason to try to do so. >> jeffrey here, coined the phrase, operation desert schmooze for this trip. i've been using it all day. it's been picked up everywhere, jeffrey. how far -- >> at least i can contribute something to the middle east debate. >> how far can you get with schmooze alone? >> this is the question. the acid test comes not right now, tomorrow he'll lay a wreath at hertzle's grave, the founder of zionism. he's doing all the things that one would have to do to gain the trust of the israeli people. the test comes when a month from now, the netanyahu government announces it's going to be building more apartments in some contested land on the west bank. and so i don't understand how the, a better relationship is going to actually affect that on a policy level. maybe they
the environment. we don't have the kids on corner fifth of jack dan will itself. >> sewed by businesses and safe businesses, there is no violence here because this is legal but there used to be violence in places like this. violent crime is why america ended 90 years of alcohol prohibition. >> we created organized crime. it organize well before prohibition. >> john: here is the murder rate about 80 years ago, it rose when alcohol was banned and dropped when it was legal again. >> if we want to do away with drug laws and say let adults do what they do, we know statistically the drug usage numbers are going to skyrocket. >> john: but we don't know that. they would think drug abuse would be rampant. portugal did he criminalized all drugs and the number of abusers did not skyrocket. >> people talk about portugals a success, it's actually a blatant failure. >> john: we went to portugal. he is just wrong. this man is portugal's drug czar 15 years ago, hair win users shot up on the streets and instead of doing what we've done they tried something different. they decriminalized every drug. crack, heroin
to the environment or whatever climate change, would be most acute. that does not appear to be the case. >> well, i think that the folks over there have common sense. they understand that one/400th n't of the greenhouse gases and man puts in 1% of that so we contribute 1/8,000 new mexico of as far as co2, and the fact the oceans have a thousand times the heat capacity of the air, and the speaker action between the -- interaction between the ocean and air drive the climate, plus the sun. so they say you keep doing that over there and we'll just keep doing what we are doing and they good on their merry way. i do know because i forecast globally i have to make forecasts every day in china, for instance. we have company that de-ices airplanes, and you're acutely aware of what the weather is doing globally as opposed to weather voyeurs who say, it's very warm today. then they hide until the next time they can point out it's word. >> neil: thank you very much. guess what. old man winter ain't done. another storm expected to hit this weekend. say it ant snow. >> it is. it is for a lot of people. a lot of
and large it hurts people. it hurts the environment. it takes from the poor gives to the rich. >> it is not true. business has lifted more people out of poverty in the last 200 years than anything that ever existed. business is a great value coordinator. the intellectuals they captured the naturety. that's greedy exploit tate tive and that narrative needs to be challenged and changed. >> your book is called conscious capitalism meaning most of the people in business aren't conscious of -- >> apparently not. they are not conscious of the great value they are creating. they are always on the offensive not able to articulate why business is good and how it is making the world a better place. >> what you are doing with whole foods some call it lefty silly feel good nonsense. what does it have to do with conscious capitalism. you sold people on whole foods as if it was better. >> no one is forced to trade with our company. there is competitive alternatives in the marketplace. they believe they are getting value and exchange. >> you have questions or comments from john mackey please
. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sur that we're putting those students through college. we don't want to force that. neil: zacatecas document elitist education system where someone is picking and choosing. >> society can't support every little thing. neil: what do you think of that? >> the problem is always going to be easy money. when you're giving away money or anything else, when it gets too sy and you see a lot of people not paying it back, you join that party. that is what is going on here. you have all of these policies out there that really hurt the job market. and that is where this comes around. then you get into the other part of the equation that everyone else has been bailed out. y not meet? neil: cash-strapped homeowners, banks. if you are up against the world, someone is going to be here to cover you. and people exhibit behavior and they wereot deliberately paying their mortgages to qualify for federal rescue program. some graduates may be thinking the same thing? >> i don't know that there is that level with sophistication.
, but looking at the action, right now suggests we're still in a fairly healthy environment. melissa: you are the first person i have heard say that today. even though we had a down day, shows a little bit of strength in the market because it wasn't even weaker based on this news? speak i think it could have been weaker, and a lot of my looking to buy the dip. two days of weakness. i'm not here to forecast what every wiggle in the market is going to be nor do we think investors should, but with part of your question is fed should investors get in, i am very fond of believing and saying get in or get out, that is gambling on a motive in time, should be a process over time. i do think there is a lot of underinvested investors in the equity on the fence looking for this. you get the money looking into by very quickly. melissa: you're both very fantastic, we really appreciate your time. melissa: here is the "money" question of the day, are you worried this could have been to other countries? you can follow me on twitter. all right, should you be going for the gold? many experts say the gold g
's environment where interest rates, in general, are so low, why take a chance? you know, it's not just on that side of the atlantic. you know, we got 0% interest rates in america. why leave money on deposit in a bank to get 0% when there's inflation, and, you know, nose are the two largest banks in cypress that failed. our two largest banks, bank of america and citi bank have over $2 trillion in total deposits. the fdic has near $25 billion in treasuries. if our largest banks were to fail, we don't have anywhere near reserves to come close to the insurance deposits let alone all deposits. sandra: let's get jordan in here, an analyst in our power panel tonight. jordan, i guess this here is going to be used -- this bailout will be used as a template for future bailouts, and that investors say, well, my money's not safe, i'm going to take it and go somewhere else. do you believe that to be the case? >> right. no, not currently just because when i look at the global markets, if you review the major european nations like germany or france, you don't see the dee tier ration that there's -- d
of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sheryl out now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup championship took place. the trough my was awarred to montrealdefeating th ottawa generals, and it's passed on every year, and current holders are the l.a. kings. the trophy was named after then governor general of canada, lord stanley presston, and last year, nearly 3 million people in the united states tuned in to watch the finals and the average ticket price of the first game was $833, and by game five, the price went up to more than a thousand dollars a ticket. well, it's the oldest trough my competed for by professional at athletes in north americ
environment, you increase the likelihood of it being used. there's this bizarre argument which goes around that you can incredibly wield military intervention as a threat and the more credible it is the less likely it gets used because it forces diplomacy. i don't think history bears that out at all. i get really, really worried, almost panicked when i hear the thought of military intervention against iran being thrown around. >> what the hell? >> it's -- you know, it was like my second day here. >> yeah. >> and midway through the day, a zumba class. >> boom. >> emerged. throbbing against this wall because that's the msnbc universal gym. >> yeah. >> and i was taken aback at first. i'm now growing sort of used to it. although it's not -- i wouldn't be totally grief stricken at leaving it behind. >> did you ever think about giving up the bike riding for midday zumba? >> yes. >> because it's right here. >> listening to zumba day in and day out has made me not want to do zumba more than anything. >> yeah. like who could blame him, right? more of our conversation today at 12:00 noon. we're goin
-qe and nonzero interest rate policy environment. the federal reserve has drilled rates down to zero because they cannot get gdp to grow because of tight regulation on the middle class. with zero percent rates, the saver earns next to noing, and the typical american family has no access to the american credit markets. >> i think we have a table we want to put up. you're basically saying that u.s. deposits are a little different from the cyprus story. u.s. savers have been badly damaged by the federal reserve policy. >> it's basically like a tax. if interest rates were at 2%, u.s. savers would earn 2% a year. last four years, they would have compounded out at 9%. instead, their earnings are basically zero, and they're underwriting the profits of the banks. >> jimmy, your response? >> you look globally at long-term interest rates, where are they going globally? down, down, down, even where banks aren't doing quantitative easing. those low rates reflect a weak economy. people aren't one thing. sure, they're savers, but they're also equity investors, who have done very nicely of late. if we foll
points. we don't anticipate a big change by the fed but given the environment around the globe this is important. >> i don't either. nobody around here seems to anticipate a big change in the fed policy. some are expecting they might tweak up their gdp forecast. that's a probability. probably we'll expect to see inflation expectations well anchored. i think you will hear that phrase as well. there's a problem with the stock market, although large parts of it are being ignored. fed ex and caterpillar had rather disappointing commentary and this is giving a lot of help to the bears who have been saying the gloge econobal econot as strong as the u.s. stock market is indicating here. the markets are ignoring fed ex and caterpillar and that's making traders say that's because all they care about is the federal reserve and what they have to say. wells fargo did downgrade another couple big machinery names, deer and agco. they downgraded that because they thought corn prices would be declining so sales would not be increasing as much next year. >> thank you very much, bob. to seema mo
understandable in this environment to watch your costs. once the risks to this up costs. why, why, why. >> we have our health insurance dictated by where we work. what is that? that is because of wage and price controls, world war ii era, and we -- neil: i understand. >> it is what it is, but that is what you get. will double down the existing system and cement tha time between employer and employee. neil: or you serve it with a government single payer system. >> ultimately you don't own your own information. this is inevitable croupy result of really bad public policy. neil: the producers after the show. >> you're going to see more and more of this, especially from large and medium-sized organizations. cbs with 200,000 employees, they are just mimicking what the federal government is modeling. be evasive, control the health care cost. ne: i don't like the intrusion, but i understand what they're up against. >> up against increased health care costs. think about it. there are a public entity. their job is to add shareholder value and equity. if they get to lower air expenses by having more he
environment. sandra: so, tuna, you're saying this move away from pay tv. will hit every provider than one. >> comcast, the reason they bought nbc universal to protect themselves a little bit on the distribution exposure that they have. what you're seeing guys like disney and cbs and parent company news corp are considered some of the premier content providers out there, someone like content nirvana, right? so the industry is going through a renaissance where a lot of company we're recommending leveraging content and monetizing them in a very, very fragmented landscape where the consumer has a lot more options than ever before. so i think the balance of power is gradually and will continue to shift in favor of branded entertainment content. adam: i think jay leno would agree with you on nbc call because he thinks they're extinct. let me ask you this. what content creators do you like? i think we're one of them, news corp, the parent company of fox business. who do you like? what companies do you really see as doing well because of this? i know that the time warner pays us to carry programi
-- this initiative proposed focuses on greenhouse gas emissions and make the environment more green and you know, your carbon footprint he when you live in an 800 square foot apartment in manhattan is much, much smaller than if you live in a 3000 square foot home in the burbs, that's clear and could be one of the goals. you also say this is about wealth redistribution on a grand scale. how so? how does the redistribution of wealth? >> well, that's what i talk about in the book, megyn. if you go back to obama's whole political history, peel don't realize it, but he's been a big backer of a movement called regionalism. that there's something fundamentally unfair about the distance of suburbs. when people move out to suburbs, they take their tax money with them and president obama and some of the people he use today work with in his political career believe that that was somehow unfair to the cities. so if you put in the smart gr growth policies and say it's about carbon dioxide and global warming, it funnels into the city and redistributing from the suburbs into the cities. and the mindset of regi
in the u.s. we have to have austerity. >> fiscal austerity only works in environments of high inflation. we need to focus on the future. focus on austerity. dennis: the government is spending too much. this is not a good thing. >> you need to regain balance over time. right now, trying to get through immediately in the united states could really put a drag on growth here. with 7.7% unemployment, we need growth. dennis: it seems like all the folks in washington when they talk about growth, they talk more about growth and tax revenue and growth and the economy. >> right now, not only the united states, but particularly europe, there is not enough focus on reform. we need to make the changes and make it easier for businesses to conduct business. dennis: packs and retitle it reform is what we need. >> absolutely. clarity about a bath for sure prosperity. dennis: thank you for being with us. peter henry. thank you. take care. cheryl: fewer americans are expecting a financial boost from their tax refund this year. 59% of people are expecting that coveted refund check that averaged $2700. 28% are
is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. can >>> good saturday afternoon, i am craig mel environment you are watching msnbc. the place for politics. >>> the senate speaks on the key step pipeline a decision from the president is expected soon. we thought it would be a good time to separate fact from fiction on that. >>> a wrap on obama's trip to the middle east. what he acokofrcomp -- accompli. >>> 98 days since newtown and more than 2200 dead. now a branch of the nra is fighting the first gun law passed after that school shooting. let's start with our top political headlines this hour. >>> late yesterday, caitlin hall began withdrew her nomination to a federal appeals court, handing a victory to republicans in the senate who twice blocked the president's pick for the key judicial post h president obama said in a statement, "i am deeply disappointed that even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continue to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination." >>> the democratically led senate rejected paul ryan's budget this week and passed its own in the wee hours of
environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-411-7040 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. bill: you're about to hear from a brave teenager outsmarting the burglars. she's 15. she was home when she heard the intruder sneak inside, she grabbed a phone, ducked inside of a closet to hide and called 911. bill: and they did. at one point you could even hear the burglars, coming within inches of where she was hiding. the teen said she stayed calm, and she stayed quiet. bill: great job by that operator too. only moments later, the trio of teenage burglars walked out of the house and into the hands of the police. cops say they may be behind a slew other burglaries in that neighborhood. heather: well, the killing of colorado's prison chief putting the spotlight on the potential dangers of his job. tom clements was murdered on his own doorstep, it happened on tuesday. autho
-- >> is there -- how much is the business environment of the city and how much of the decisions being mid at the margin by whether it is wealthy people or people coming up businesses or somewhere else, how much is that affected? what tipping point is there when things like in positions and mandates like paid sick leave or higher taxes push people over that marginal line and decide not to open -- >> decree eighting opportunity, creating that path to the middle class of new york city, only helps create a stronger city. what you are seeing is new york city being made weaker. as we saw by the grass. the exodus of middle income workers. that's killing the city. middle mcindividuaclass individ backbone of the city. drying up bit by bit. s it is better to be the people of the city of new york. >> we have policies that make it attractive to come to new york. new york city is always going to be a best nation for people from around the country, around the world. and we have to make it's easier for not only businesses and no only the big companies, but the mom and pops. i have called for the elimination of some o
green. but his motivation for a planer existence wasn't just about money or environment. >> i think life's about experience and about connection and about relationships. so i think you want to sort of maximum your time focused on that and minimize your time focused on acquiring more stuff and dealing with it. >> now, graham hill does acknowledge that if you are married or if you have a child, the minimalist lifestyle becomes a lot tougher. >>> starbucks' ceo howard schultz, him having an opinion on same-sex marriage, is it bad for business? you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. exciting and would always come max and pto my rescue. bookstore but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so
are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)